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Domain-Driven Design
48,52 € *
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"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. "His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. "The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers-it is a future classic." - Ralph Johnson , author of Design Patterns "If you don't think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you've forgotten to do. "Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion." - Dave Collins , author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling-and building-business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric's descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." - Luke Hohmann , author of Beyond Software Architecture This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer. --Kent Beck What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important. --Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(TM) Programming with IBM® WebSphere® The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process. Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development. Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Dr

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 05.07.2020
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User Stories Applied
34,64 € *
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Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application. Product Description Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with "user stories": simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other "proxies" Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. Features + Benefits Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. ° A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements ° Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community ° Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins Backcover Agile requirements: discovering what your users really want. With this book, you will learn to: Flexible, quick and practical requirements that work Save time and develop better software that meets users' needs Gathering user stories -- even when you can't talk to users How user stories work, and how they differ from use cases, scenarios, and traditional requirements Leveraging user stories as part of planning, scheduling, estimating, and testing Ideal for Extreme Programming, Scrum, or any other agile methodology ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with user stories: simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other proxies Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. ADDISON-WESLEY PROFESSIONAL Boston, MA 02116 www.awprofessional.com ISBN: 0-321-20568-5 Foreword. Acknowledgments. Introduction. I: GETTING STARTED. 1: An Overview. What Is a User Story? Where Are the Details? "How Long Does It Have to Be?" The Customer Team. What Will the Process Be Like? Planning Releases and Iterations. What Are Acceptance Tests? Why Change? Summary. Questions. 2: Writing Stories. Independent. Negotiable. Valuable to Purchasers or Users. Estimatable. Small. Testable. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 3: User Role Modeling. User Roles. Role Modeling Steps. Two Additional Techniques. What If I Have On-Site Users? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 4: Gathering Stories. Elicitation and Capture Should Be Illicit. A Little Is Enough, or Is It? Techniques. User Interviews. Questionnaires. Observation. Story-Writing Workshops. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 5: Working with User Proxies. The Users' Manager. A Development Manager. Salespersons. Domain Experts. The Marketing Group. Former Users. Customers. Trainers and Technical Support. Business or Systems Analysts. What to Do When Working with a User Proxy. Can You Do It Yourself? Constituting the Customer Team. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 6: Acceptance Testing User Stories. Write Tests Before Coding. The Customer Specifies the Tests. Testing Is Part of the Process. How Many Tests Are Too Many? The Framework for Integrated Test. Types of Testing. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 7: Guidelines for Good Stories. Start with Goal Stories. Slice the Cake. Write Closed Stories. Put Constraints on Cards. Size the Story to the Horizon. Keep the UI Out as Long as Possible. Some Things Aren't Stories. Include User Roles in the Stories. Write for One User. Write in Active Voice. Customer Writes. Don't Number Story Cards. Don't Forget the Purpose. Summary. Questions. II: ESTIMATING AND PLANNING. 8: Estimating User Stories. Story Points. Estimate as a Team. Estimating. Triangulate. Using Story Points. What If We Pair Program? Some Reminders. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 9: Planning a Release. When Do We Want the Release? What Would You Like in It? Prioritizing the Stories. Mixed Priorities. Risky Stories. Prioritizing Infrastructural Needs. Selecting an Iteration Length. From Story Points to Expected Duration. The Initial Velocity. Creating the Release Plan. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 10: Planning an Iteration. Iteration Planning Overview. Discussing the Stories. Disaggregating into Tasks. Accepting Responsibility. Estimate and Confirm. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 11: Measuring and Monitoring Velocity. Measuring Velocity. Planned and Actual Velocity. Iteration Burndown Charts. Burndown Charts During an Iteration. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. III: FREQUENTLY DISCUSSED TOPICS. 12: What Stories Are Not. User Stories Aren't IEEE 830. User Stories Are Not Use Cases. User Stories Aren't Scenarios. Summary. Questions. 13: Why User Stories? Verbal Communication. User Stories Are Comprehensible. User Stories Are the Right Size for Planning. User Stories Work for Iterative Development. Stories Encourage Deferring Detail. Stories Support Opportunistic Development. User Stories Encourage Participatory Design. Stories Build Up Tacit Knowledge. Why Not Stories? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 14: A Catalog of Story Smells. Stories Are Too Small. Interdependent Stories. Goldplating. Too Many Details. Including User Interface Detail Too Soon. Thinking Too Far Ahead. Splitting Too Many Stories. Customer Has Trouble Prioritizing. Customer Won't Write and Prioritize the Stories. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 15: Using Stories with Scrum. Scrum Is Iterative and Incremental. The Basics of Scrum. The Scrum Team. The Product Backlog. The Sprint Planning Meeting. The Sprint Review Meeting. The Daily Scrum Meeting. Adding Stories to Scrum. A Case Study. Summary. Questions. 16: Additional Topics. Handling NonFunctional Requirements. Paper or Software? User Stories and the User Interface. Retaining the Stories. Stories for Bugs. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. IV: AN EXAMPLE. 17: The User Roles. The Project. Identifying the Customer. Identifying Some Initial Roles. Consolidating and Narrowing. Role Modeling. Adding Personas. 18: The Stories. Stories for Teresa. Stories for Captain Ron. Stories for a Novice Sailor. Stories for a Non-Sailing Gift Buyer. Stories for a Report Viewer. Some Administration Stories. Wrapping Up. 19: Estimating the Stories. The First Story. Advanced Search. Rating and Reviewing. Accounts. Finishing the Estimates. All the Estimates. 20: The Release Plan. Estimating Velocity. Prioritizing the Stories. The Finished Release Plan. 21: The Acceptance Tests.The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 05.07.2020
Zum Angebot
User Stories Applied
34,64 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application. Product Description Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with "user stories": simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other "proxies" Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. Features + Benefits Learn to build robust software that more closely meets the customer's needs through applying the concept of user stories. ° A clear explanation of the most agile means of gathering software requirements ° Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile software development community ° Allows the reader to save time and resources by gathering the proper requirements BEFORE coding begins Backcover Agile requirements: discovering what your users really want. With this book, you will learn to: Flexible, quick and practical requirements that work Save time and develop better software that meets users' needs Gathering user stories -- even when you can't talk to users How user stories work, and how they differ from use cases, scenarios, and traditional requirements Leveraging user stories as part of planning, scheduling, estimating, and testing Ideal for Extreme Programming, Scrum, or any other agile methodology ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thoroughly reviewed and eagerly anticipated by the agile community, User Stories Applied offers a requirements process that saves time, eliminates rework, and leads directly to better software. The best way to build software that meets users' needs is to begin with user stories: simple, clear, brief descriptions of functionality that will be valuable to real users. In User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn provides you with a front-to-back blueprint for writing these user stories and weaving them into your development lifecycle. You'll learn what makes a great user story, and what makes a bad one. You'll discover practical ways to gather user stories, even when you can't speak with your users. Then, once you've compiled your user stories, Cohn shows how to organize them, prioritize them, and use them for planning, management, and testing. User role modeling: understanding what users have in common, and where they differ Gathering stories: user interviewing, questionnaires, observation, and workshops Working with managers, trainers, salespeople and other proxies Writing user stories for acceptance testing Using stories to prioritize, set schedules, and estimate release costs Includes end-of-chapter practice questions and exercises User Stories Applied will be invaluable to every software developer, tester, analyst, and manager working with any agile method: XP, Scrum... or even your own home-grown approach. ADDISON-WESLEY PROFESSIONAL Boston, MA 02116 www.awprofessional.com ISBN: 0-321-20568-5 Foreword. Acknowledgments. Introduction. I: GETTING STARTED. 1: An Overview. What Is a User Story? Where Are the Details? "How Long Does It Have to Be?" The Customer Team. What Will the Process Be Like? Planning Releases and Iterations. What Are Acceptance Tests? Why Change? Summary. Questions. 2: Writing Stories. Independent. Negotiable. Valuable to Purchasers or Users. Estimatable. Small. Testable. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 3: User Role Modeling. User Roles. Role Modeling Steps. Two Additional Techniques. What If I Have On-Site Users? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 4: Gathering Stories. Elicitation and Capture Should Be Illicit. A Little Is Enough, or Is It? Techniques. User Interviews. Questionnaires. Observation. Story-Writing Workshops. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 5: Working with User Proxies. The Users' Manager. A Development Manager. Salespersons. Domain Experts. The Marketing Group. Former Users. Customers. Trainers and Technical Support. Business or Systems Analysts. What to Do When Working with a User Proxy. Can You Do It Yourself? Constituting the Customer Team. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 6: Acceptance Testing User Stories. Write Tests Before Coding. The Customer Specifies the Tests. Testing Is Part of the Process. How Many Tests Are Too Many? The Framework for Integrated Test. Types of Testing. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 7: Guidelines for Good Stories. Start with Goal Stories. Slice the Cake. Write Closed Stories. Put Constraints on Cards. Size the Story to the Horizon. Keep the UI Out as Long as Possible. Some Things Aren't Stories. Include User Roles in the Stories. Write for One User. Write in Active Voice. Customer Writes. Don't Number Story Cards. Don't Forget the Purpose. Summary. Questions. II: ESTIMATING AND PLANNING. 8: Estimating User Stories. Story Points. Estimate as a Team. Estimating. Triangulate. Using Story Points. What If We Pair Program? Some Reminders. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 9: Planning a Release. When Do We Want the Release? What Would You Like in It? Prioritizing the Stories. Mixed Priorities. Risky Stories. Prioritizing Infrastructural Needs. Selecting an Iteration Length. From Story Points to Expected Duration. The Initial Velocity. Creating the Release Plan. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 10: Planning an Iteration. Iteration Planning Overview. Discussing the Stories. Disaggregating into Tasks. Accepting Responsibility. Estimate and Confirm. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 11: Measuring and Monitoring Velocity. Measuring Velocity. Planned and Actual Velocity. Iteration Burndown Charts. Burndown Charts During an Iteration. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. III: FREQUENTLY DISCUSSED TOPICS. 12: What Stories Are Not. User Stories Aren't IEEE 830. User Stories Are Not Use Cases. User Stories Aren't Scenarios. Summary. Questions. 13: Why User Stories? Verbal Communication. User Stories Are Comprehensible. User Stories Are the Right Size for Planning. User Stories Work for Iterative Development. Stories Encourage Deferring Detail. Stories Support Opportunistic Development. User Stories Encourage Participatory Design. Stories Build Up Tacit Knowledge. Why Not Stories? Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 14: A Catalog of Story Smells. Stories Are Too Small. Interdependent Stories. Goldplating. Too Many Details. Including User Interface Detail Too Soon. Thinking Too Far Ahead. Splitting Too Many Stories. Customer Has Trouble Prioritizing. Customer Won't Write and Prioritize the Stories. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. 15: Using Stories with Scrum. Scrum Is Iterative and Incremental. The Basics of Scrum. The Scrum Team. The Product Backlog. The Sprint Planning Meeting. The Sprint Review Meeting. The Daily Scrum Meeting. Adding Stories to Scrum. A Case Study. Summary. Questions. 16: Additional Topics. Handling NonFunctional Requirements. Paper or Software? User Stories and the User Interface. Retaining the Stories. Stories for Bugs. Summary. Developer Responsibilities. Customer Responsibilities. Questions. IV: AN EXAMPLE. 17: The User Roles. The Project. Identifying the Customer. Identifying Some Initial Roles. Consolidating and Narrowing. Role Modeling. Adding Personas. 18: The Stories. Stories for Teresa. Stories for Captain Ron. Stories for a Novice Sailor. Stories for a Non-Sailing Gift Buyer. Stories for a Report Viewer. Some Administration Stories. Wrapping Up. 19: Estimating the Stories. The First Story. Advanced Search. Rating and Reviewing. Accounts. Finishing the Estimates. All the Estimates. 20: The Release Plan. Estimating Velocity. Prioritizing the Stories. The Finished Release Plan. 21: The Acceptance Tests.The concept of user stories has its roots as one of the main tenets of Extreme Programming. In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 05.07.2020
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Pearson Education Domain-Driven Design Software...
68,47 € *
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"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing."His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain, it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique."The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers-it is a future classic." - Ralph Johnson , author of Design Patterns "If you don't think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you've forgotten to do."Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion." - Dave Collins , author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling-and building-business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric's descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." - Luke Hohmann , author of Beyond Software Architecture This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer.--Kent BeckWhat Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important.--Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(TM) Programming with IBM® WebSphere®The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process. Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development.Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Dr

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 05.07.2020
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Web and Wireless Geographical Information Systems
82,90 CHF *
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These proceedings contain the papers selected for presentation at the 5th edition of the International Workshop on Web and Wireless Geographical Information Systems, held in December 2005, in Lausanne, Switzerland. The aim of the series of annual W2GIS workshops is to provide an up-to-date review of advances on recent devel- ment and research results in the field of web and wireless geographical information systems. It follows the successful 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 editions, held in Kyoto, Singapore, Rome and Seoul, respectively. It now represents a young but rapidly - turing research community. In its 5th year, W2GIS reached new heights of recognition as a quality workshop for the dissemination and discussion on latest research and development achievements in the domain. The number of papers received for this workshop demonstrates the growing interest of the research community. There were 70 submissions from 17 countries, many of them of excellent quality and most of them very related to the t- ics of the workshop. Each paper receives three reviews. Based on these reviews, 25 papers were selected for presentation and inclusion in the proceedings. The accepted papers cover a wide range of topics from the Semantic Web, Web personalization, contextual representation and mapping to querying in mobile environments, to mobile networks and location-based services. We had the privilege of having a distinguished invited talk “The next revolution: Peer-to-Peer discovery on mobile devices” by Ouri Wolfson, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.07.2020
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Discoidin Domain Receptors in Health and Disease
242,00 CHF *
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The interactions of cells with their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a pivotal role in driving normal cell behavior, from development to tissue differentiation and function. At the cellular level, organ homeostasis depends on a productive communication between cells and ECM, which eventually leads to the normal phenotypic repertoire that characterize each cell type in the organism.  A failure to establish these normal interactions and to interpret the cues emanating from the ECM is one of the major causes in abnormal development and the pathogenesis of multiple diseases. To recognize and act upon the biophysical signals that are generated by the cross talk between cells and ECM, the cells developed specific receptors, among them a unique set of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), known as the Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs). The DDRs are the only RTKs that specifically bind to and are activated by collagen, a major protein component of the ECM. Hence, the DDRs are part of the signaling networks that translate information from the ECM, and thus they are key regulators of cell-matrix interactions. Under physiological conditions, DDRs control cell and tissue homeostasis by acting on collagen sensors; transducing signals that regulate cell polarity, tissue morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and collagen deposition. DDRs play a key role in diseases that are characterized by dysfunction of the stromal component, which lead to abnormal collagen deposition and the resulting fibrotic response that disrupt normal organ function in disease of the cardiovascular system, lungs and kidneys, just to mention a few. In cancer, DDRs are hijacked by tumor and stromal cells to disrupt normal cell-collagen communication and initiate pro-oncogenic programs. Importantly, several cancer types exhibit DDR mutations, which are thought to alter receptor function, and contribute to cancer progression. Therefore, the strong causative association between altered RTK function and disease it is been translated today in the development of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting DDRs for various disease conditions. In spite of the accumulating evidence highlighting the importance of DDRs in health and diseases, there is still much to learn about these unique RTKs, as of today there is a lack in the medical literature of a book dedicated solely to DDRs. This is the first comprehensive volume dedicated to DDRs, which will fill a gap in the field and serve those interested in the scientific community to learn more about these important receptors in health and disease.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.07.2020
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Domain-Driven Design
75,90 CHF *
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'Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. 'His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. 'The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers-it is a future classic.' - Ralph Johnson , author of Design Patterns 'If you don't think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you've forgotten to do. 'Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion.' - Dave Collins , author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces 'Eric weaves real-world experience modeling-and building-business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric's descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field.' - Luke Hohmann , author of Beyond Software Architecture This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer. --Kent Beck What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We've given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we've never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important. --Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(TM) Programming with IBM® WebSphere® The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process. Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development. Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Dr

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.07.2020
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The Essential Book Blog: The Complete Bibliophi...
1,00 CHF *
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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * READERS, WRITERS, REVIEWERS & BLOGGERS: MONETIZE YOUR BOOK BLOG! MAXIMIZE YOUR ROYALTIES! * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * CONTENTS (major headings): 1. Introduction: Why book bloggers are poised to benefit from a publishing world in flux 2. Opportunity Knocks: Book bloggers are at the center of a burgeoning new industry 3. Book Reviewing Crash Course: Whether you're an author or a reader seeking reviews, or you're new to the review process, understanding the process of review writing will benefit you 4. Review Writing: A more advanced look at reviews and their parts 5. Build Your Virtual Home: All the tools you will need to create and grow a blog or website for free, including domain names and hosting options, filling your site and managing content and visitors 6. Free is Good...: How to acquire books and content for free (or, if you're an author, how to locate reviewers willing to talk about your book) 7...Paid is Better: Morally-sound practices for monetizing your efforts, whether the sale of your own books or others, and maximizing income. 8. Wrapping Up: How to be a responsible Netizen; The Profit and Popularity Formula 9. Supplementary Materials: Advanced writing/reviewing tools and additional resources WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM The Essential Book Blog: All bibliophiles: readers, writers, collectors, sellers, particularly: 1. Book reviewers, from beginner to semi-professional 2. Authors, whether self-published, vanity, or traditionally published, writers yearning to connect with readers and reviewers and increase exposure for their books 3. General content bloggers and product reviewers who wish to begin to profit from their on-line content or grow their business 4. Anyone wishing to learn more about the burgeoning global on-line literary community and the financial opportunities available to them, whether in their spare time or as a full-time endeavor

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.07.2020
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Discoidin Domain Receptors in Health and Disease
212,90 CHF *
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The interactions of cells with their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a pivotal role in driving normal cell behavior, from development to tissue differentiation and function. At the cellular level, organ homeostasis depends on a productive communication between cells and ECM, which eventually leads to the normal phenotypic repertoire that characterize each cell type in the organism. A failure to establish these normal interactions and to interpret the cues emanating from the ECM is one of the major causes in abnormal development and the pathogenesis of multiple diseases. To recognize and act upon the biophysical signals that are generated by the cross talk between cells and ECM, the cells developed specific receptors, among them a unique set of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), known as the Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs). The DDRs are the only RTKs that specifically bind to and are activated by collagen, a major protein component of the ECM. Hence, the DDRs are part of the signaling networks that translate information from the ECM, and thus they are key regulators of cell-matrix interactions. Under physiological conditions, DDRs control cell and tissue homeostasis by acting on collagen sensors; transducing signals that regulate cell polarity, tissue morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and collagen deposition. DDRs play a key role in diseases that are characterized by dysfunction of the stromal component, which lead to abnormal collagen deposition and the resulting fibrotic response that disrupt normal organ function in disease of the cardiovascular system, lungs and kidneys, just to mention a few. In cancer, DDRs are hijacked by tumor and stromal cells to disrupt normal cell-collagen communication and initiate pro-oncogenic programs. Importantly, several cancer types exhibit DDR mutations, which are thought to alter receptor function, and contribute to cancer progression. Therefore, the strong causative association between altered RTK function and disease it is been translated today in the development of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting DDRs for various disease conditions. In spite of the accumulating evidence highlighting the importance of DDRs in health and diseases, there is still much to learn about these unique RTKs, as of today there is a lack in the medical literature of a book dedicated solely to DDRs. This is the first comprehensive volume dedicated to DDRs, which will fill a gap in the field and serve those interested in the scientific community to learn more about these important receptors in health and disease.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.07.2020
Zum Angebot